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Past Issues

Volume 13, Number 3 - 3rd Quarter 2015

LOGBOOK is a quarterly magazine covering the entire spectrum of international aviation history, from the first tentative attempts at flight, to history that was made just yesterday.

LOGBOOK is a distinctive publication in the field of aviation history. At LOGBOOK we certainly enjoy bringing you in-depth articles written by some of the world’s premier aviation historians. More importantly, however, we also enjoy working with, actively encouraging and publishing the first-time, one-time and fledgling author. These are the folks who actually lived the aviation history they are writing about, which lets the reader experience the action from a unique perspective. This allows LOGBOOK to bring you aviation history you will find no other place.

Back Issue: Available
 

The Life of John R. Sorensen

A young John R Sorensen, during flight training. Photo: Delores Sorensen A young John R Sorensen, during flight training. Photo: Delores Sorensen
"Then along came Pearl Harbor, Dec 7, 1941. A crash program began to expand in all branches of the military. I kept checking with the recruiting sergeant and he assured me I would be called up sometime in January 1942. The morning of January 27, 1942, he called me at work and he informed me fifty of us would be leaving Milwaukee for Kelly Field San Antonio, Texas at 6 00 a.m. the 28th of January. And it was 2 years until I got back to Wisconsin again."
In hisown words, the late John R Sorensen tells of his life and time flying the North American A-36 Apache in North Africa and Italy.
This is first-person aviation history - the best.
 

Fly Targets, Flying Coffins. The Missions of David Romans, DFC

An RAF Fortress I crew manning up for another mission.  Photo: Tim Callaway Collection An RAF Fortress I crew manning up for another mission. Photo: Tim Callaway Collection
At 9:14 hours on 8 September 1941, four U.S.-built Boeing B-17C Flying Fortresses bearing British Royal Air Force insignia and Serial Numbers took off from Kinloss, Scotland. Piloting one of the planes was Flying Officer David Romans, a holder of the Distinguished Flying Cross. The bombers were flying a mission that would affect the Royal Air Force’s bombing strategy for the remainder of World War Two.
Canadian author Herb Kugel tells the story of Flying Officer Romans, and his missions over occupied Europe.
 

The Graf Zeppelin Hitler's Aircraft Carrier - Conclusion

The saga is complete - the last days of the Graf Zeppelin.  Photo: U.S. Navy The saga is complete - the last days of the Graf Zeppelin. Photo: U.S. Navy
Part Seven - and the conclusion - of Colonel Douglas Dildy's comprehensive history of the KMS Graf Zeppelin - Hitler's only aircraft carrier.
In this last installment, Colonel Dildy tells of what finally happened to the many aircraft that were originally planned to equip the ill-fated carrier. Clearly the war was surging towards its inevitable conclusion, and many of these specialized aircraft were used in a desperate fight to stem a constant stream of German defeats.
And, of course, there are the final days of the ship itself, soon to fall into Soviet hands. It was an inglorious end for a vessel that now rests peacefully on the bottom of the Baltic Sea.
The story is complete.