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Past Issues

Volume 13, Number 1 - 1st Quarter 2015

LOGBOOK is a quarterly magazine covering the entire spectrum of international aviation history, from the first tentative attempts at flight, to history that was made just yesterday.

LOGBOOK is a distinctive publication in the field of aviation history. At LOGBOOK we certainly enjoy bringing you in-depth articles written by some of the world’s premier aviation historians. More importantly, however, we also enjoy working with, actively encouraging and publishing the first-time, one-time and fledgling author. These are the folks who actually lived the aviation history they are writing about, which lets the reader experience the action from a unique perspective. This allows LOGBOOK to bring you aviation history you will find no other place.

If you have a flying tale to tell or simply love to read great aviation history, subscribe today.

Back Issue: Available
 

Keep Them in the Fight

Douglas R5D Skymasters - assigned to NATS. Photo: U.S. Navy Douglas R5D Skymasters - assigned to NATS. Photo: U.S. Navy
“I believe you know of my interest in the Navy and my close connection with the Navy in the development of the Trans-Pacific and Trans-Atlantic air operations while with the Pan American Airways and the development of Patrol Bombers by the Martin Company.” So wrote C.H. (“Dutch”) Schildhauer in July 1941 to Captain D.C. Ramsey of the U.S. Navy’s bureau of Aeronautics. The last two years, Schildhauer explained, he had been “giving considerable thought to the Transocean Air Transport Service, and its development in conjunction with and as an asset to the Navy.” A formal proposal - “Naval Air Transport” - accompanied Schildhauer’s letter.
Accompanying Dana Martin's article - a history of the Naval Air Transport Service.
 

Ralph Martin - NATS Pilot

Ensign Ralph Martin - Newly designated Naval Aviator. Photo: Dana Martin Ensign Ralph Martin - Newly designated Naval Aviator. Photo: Dana Martin
Ralph Martin, my father, was enjoying a Sunday leave in downtown Corpus Christi, Texas, when the bombs were dropped on Pearl Harbor.
Upon receiving news of the Pearl Harbor attack that Day of Infamy, the base commander sent the military police into the town to round up those who were enjoying their day’s pass. In the way of the military, the men were given no explanation. They were told simply to report back to the base as quickly as possible. Only upon their return did they learn that the United States was now at war. Training continued, though likely at a somewhat accelerated pace. Some weeks following the attack, an officer came to the base to ask for volunteers for “a top secret mission.” No information was given other than it might take any volunteers into Russia.
Wearing the Gold Wings of a brand new Naval Aviator, Ralph Martin was assigned to the Naval Air Transport Service (NATS), an integral part of the effort to win the War.
Dana Martin tells his story.
 

Graf Zeppelin, Hitler's Aircraft Carrier - Part Five

Junkers Ju 87, being tested as a carrier-based torpedo bomber.  Photo: Thijs Postma Junkers Ju 87, being tested as a carrier-based torpedo bomber. Photo: Thijs Postma
As the War in Europe progresses Hitler’s aircraft carrier Graf Zeppelin languishes unused, and the squadrons originally designated for the aircraft carrier’s air wing are assigned to other missions and other areas of operation.
In Part Five of this epic series, Colonel Doug Dildy’s continues his comprehensive history of the ship and its aircraft, now with an exposition on the formerly carrier-based squadrons – particularly the Junkers Ju 87 Stuka dive bombers – and their incorporation in Germany’s general war effort. At this point in the War, Germany could not let any assets – planes and pilots – sit idle.