Choose: Normal Print / Large Print

Past Issues

Volume 11, Number 3 - 3rd Quarter 2012

LOGBOOK is a quarterly magazine covering the entire spectrum of international aviation history, from the first tentative attempts at flight, to history that was made just yesterday.

LOGBOOK is a distinctive publication in the field of aviation history. At LOGBOOK we certainly enjoy bringing you in-depth articles written by some of the world’s premier aviation historians. More importantly, however, we also enjoy working with, actively encouraging and publishing the first-time, one-time and fledgling author. These are the folks who actually lived the aviation history they are writing about, which lets the reader experience the action from a unique perspective. This allows LOGBOOK to bring you aviation history you will find no other place.

Back Issue: Available
 

A Pilot Called ‘Moose’

Wing Commander Robert Carl “Moose” Fumerton, then commanding officer of No.406 Squadron - a Canadian night fighter unit. Wing Commander Robert Carl “Moose” Fumerton, then commanding officer of No.406 Squadron - a Canadian night fighter unit.
Robert Carl ‘Moose’ Fumerton was a hefty, six-foot plus, ice hockey playing woodsman. He became Canada’s top World War Two night-fighter ace. He earned his `Moose’ nickname because he regularly had to shove and squeeze his large body into the cockpit of any fighter he flew. However, once in the cockpit, Fumerton regularly showed himself to be an aggressive and skillful pilot. On one occasion, fellow pilot George Sutherland complained about his Bristol Beaufighter: “The plane, with its two powerful Hercules engines, had earned a reputation for being unforgiving with any but the most competent pilots.” Fumerton volunteered to fly Sutherland’s plane, doing this with Sutherland standing in the well behind the pilot’s seat. The Beaufighter behaved perfectly under Fumerton’s touch. “I don’t see much wrong with this machine,” Fumerton said, then put the Beaufighter into a flawlessly executed slow roll.
Sutherland commented on this incident: “God, that roll was smooth as a baby’s bottom. And I thought to myself, ‘Jesus, he’s a better pilot than I am.’”
Fellow Canadian Herb Kugel tells Moose's wartime story.
 

Airborne Alert and the Cuban Missile Crisis

A B-52 Stratofortress assigned to the 96th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron receives fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker from the 506th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron. Photo: USAF by Capt. Chris A B-52 Stratofortress assigned to the 96th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron receives fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker from the 506th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron. Photo: USAF by Capt. Chris
From Air Force General David A. Burchinal’s Oral History report – he was Director of Plans on the Air Staff during the period of the Cuban Missile Crisis – we have the opportunity of understanding what actually took place in the Pentagon during the crucial days of the Cuban Missile Crisis, and it is quite different than some of the scholarly recitations of how the diplomats handled the situation. According to General Burchinal, even our Ambassador in Moscow, Fay Kohler was quoted as saying, “It was very clear that the United States took the Chairman to the brink of nuclear war and he [Khrushchev] looked over the edge and had no stomach for it.”
The point General Burchinal was making was that even before the President [Kennedy] spoke to the public, the military was given considerable latitude in bringing all of the forces in the United States to a high state of readiness. He further states that the military had called all of the missiles back that were in the hands of the contractor for maintenance and repair, called them in and counted them down as combat ready. They increased the Airborne Alert force of Boeing B-52 Stratofortress bombers, up to one third of the force. They had Strategic Air Command (SAC) bombers on nuclear alert, with weapons in the bomb bays, on civilian airfields all over the United States. Likewise, the Air Force dispersed Air Defense Command (ADC) forces, also armed with nuclear weapons, to civilian airports all over the country.
Retired U.S. Air Force Major Don Clawson tells the story from the keen vantage point of one who was in the air - in a B-52 - during the crisis.
 

On The Ontario Classic Bush Plane Trail

A rare bird - Chimo Air Services Beech Model 18 on floats - C-FHZA - heads out for another hop.      Photo: Michael Prophet A rare bird - Chimo Air Services Beech Model 18 on floats - C-FHZA - heads out for another hop. Photo: Michael Prophet
Bound for Canada
Canada holds a special place in my heart having lived in London, Ontario and Edmonton during my early teens, and I consider it to be my second home. In addition to frequent visits to family and friends, I have also visited numerous interesting propliner heavens in places like Vancouver & Yellowknife. This year, together with my intrepid aviation travel companion Mr. Andre van Loon, we decided to visit the windy city of Winnipeg. Part of our plan was to drive east on the Trans Canadian Highway 1, towards the bush country in neighbouring Ontario province. Our itinerary included such places as Vermillion Bay, Sioux Narrows, Nestor Falls, Minaki and Red Lake.
Located in the center of the town of Red Lake, on the shore of Howey Bay, one can find the Norseman Heritage Park, which features a fully restored Noorduyn Norseman – registered CF-DRD – mounted on a pedestal. Bush flying has always played a prominent role in the community and still remains an important way to transport goods and people in the region. There were many types of bush planes used in this area, but the Norseman was considered the workhorse of the North and was built specifically for the Canadian wilderness. CF-DRD pays tribute to the men who flew her and the rugged design of the aircraft. It is one of the famous focal points of Red lake – The Norseman Capital of the World.
Intrepid Propliner fan Michael Prophet tracks down some classic old floatplane - still earning a living today.