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Past Issues

Volume 8, Number 3 - 3rd Quarter 2007

LOGBOOK is a quarterly magazine covering the entire spectrum of aviation history, from the first flight to just yesterday. Civil, Military, Airline, General Aviation - We bring you the stories that have rarely or never been published before, told by the people who lived them. If the story is known, we dig to find additional information, documents and photographs to add to the knowledge about the topic. Short stories, sea stories, personal remembrances, in-depth information and simple hangar flying are the kind of unique aviation history you will find in the pages of LOGBOOK.

Back Issue: Sorry - Sold Out
 

Two Flyers and Their Norwegian Adventure

A flight of two Arado Ar 196 float planes, assigned to Seeaufklarungsgruppe 125. A flight of two Arado Ar 196 float planes, assigned to Seeaufklarungsgruppe 125.
During the early spring of 1940, the German General Staff began planning for the invasion of Denmark and Norway. The code name for the operation, to be launched during the first week of April 1940, was Weserübung. For Hitler, the invasion of Norway and Denmark would provide his air force and navy with positions on Britain’s northern flank. From these positions the Germans could raid shipping and coastal targets at will. However, of more importance to the German war economy was the protection of German shipments of Swedish iron ore that a successful invasion of Scandinavia would bring. Ever fearful of Allied movements in the region, Hitler ordered Weserübung was to be planned and launched under the strictest security. Many of the troops who were destined to take part in the operation were not informed of their true mission until only hours before the invasion commenced. Such high security even extended to the two Luftwaffe officers who were assigned to the Kriegsmarine’s light cruiser KMS Karlsruhe.
Historian Adam Thompson tells the tale of these two aviators as they fly their Arado Ar 196 float plane during the often confused, but ultimately successful, Operation Weserübung.
 

Buckeyes and VT-4

A portly but purposeful North American T-2B Buckeye - BuNo 152443 - assigned to VT-4. Photo: NMNA A portly but purposeful North American T-2B Buckeye - BuNo 152443 - assigned to VT-4. Photo: NMNA
The North American T-2 Buckeye has been in service for nearly 40 years. Literally thousands of young Student Naval Aviators experienced their first jet flight in the Buckeye. Indeed, these same young aviators piloted the Buckeye through their first carrier landings. Although there are still a few T-2s on active duty, at the time this article was published the venerable trainer had been all but replaced by the Boeing T-45 Goshawk.
Back in the 1970s, then Lieutenant John J. “Jack” Flanagan was an instructor pilot in Training Squadron FOUR (VT-4), down at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida. Through his words readers can experience the high energy world of jet flight training. Sometimes funny and sometimes scary, but always exciting, now retired Captain Jack Flanagan puts you in the front seat of the T-2 Buckeye. So pull on your “Speed Jeans,” strap into the ejection seat and enjoy.
 

Royal Air Force Fortress I Operations

Originally allotted to the U. S. Army Air Corps as a Boeing B-17C - S/N 40-2064 -this Fortress I was one of twenty that went to the RAF. Originally allotted to the U. S. Army Air Corps as a Boeing B-17C - S/N 40-2064 -this Fortress I was one of twenty that went to the RAF.
At 9:14 on the morning of 8 September 1941, four unescorted Royal Air Force Boeing B-17C Flying Fortress bombers took off from Kinloss in Northern Scotland. These bombers carried Royal Air Force crews and wore Royal Air Force insignia. The type had been renamed Fortress I. Although the Royal Air Force couldn’t know it, these “Forts” were starting a mission that would affect its bombing operations for the rest of World War Two.
The introduction of the Fortress I to combat operations was one fraught with mistakes and tragedy. The crews, however, demonstrated a bravery and determination above and beyond the call of duty.
Author Herb Kugel tells the story.