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Past Issues

Volume 7, Number 1 - 1st Quarter 2006

LOGBOOK is a quarterly magazine covering the entire spectrum of aviation history, from the first flight to just yesterday. Civil, Military, Airline, General Aviation - We bring you the stories that have rarely or never been published before, told by the people who lived them. If the story is known, we dig to find additional information, documents and photographs to add to the knowledge about the topic. Short stories, sea stories, personal remembrances, in-depth information and simple hangar flying are the kind of unique aviation history you will find in the pages of LOGBOOK.

Back Issue: Available
 

Pilot Notes: Flying Three British Jets

Two British Royal Air Force SEPECAT GR-1A Jaguar fighter reconnaissance aircraft fly a sortie in support of Operation NORTHERN WATCH. Two British Royal Air Force SEPECAT GR-1A Jaguar fighter reconnaissance aircraft fly a sortie in support of Operation NORTHERN WATCH.
The United Kingdom’s Royal Air Force is certainly well known for its famous stand against Nazi Germany’s Luftwaffe during the Battle of Britain. Additionally, during World War Two, the RAF Bomber Command’s offensive played a significant role in the eventual defeat of Germany. Unfortunately, much less is known, on the west-side of the Atlantic, about the RAF’s post-war aviation industry and some of the truly unique designs that the service has flown during the past 50 or so years.
Active duty U.S. Air Force Colonel Brick Eisel conducted dozens of first person interviews with RAF aviators to garner their impressions of three British fast jets: the English Electric Lightning, the Blackburn Buccaneer and the SEPECAT Jaguar. These aircraft cover the span of over 40 years.
This is some great aviation history told by the folks that were doing the driving.
 

Letters From France

Frances B. Frances B. "France" Postai
On the day the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor and brought the United States into World War Two, Francis B. Postai was just a 17 year-old kid going to school at the Kansas State Teachers College and working in his dad’s garage. Francis – known as “France” to family and friends – was a Kansas boy born and raised in Pittsburg, a small town in the southeast corner of the state.
Later, as a Republic P-47 Thunderbolt pilot flying the in the dangerous skies over occupied Europe, France kept in touch with his family back home with a steady stream of letters. These letters were saved by his family, and are the basis of very personal view of the war, flying in combat and life in the U.S. Army Air Corps.
Compiled by retired Air Force Colonel Douglas Dildy – a close family friend – these letters are aviation history in the first person sense, and make for some very compelling reading.
 

Early SR-71 Flight Test

Chosen by Kelly Johnson for his experience testing the F-104 Starfighter, Robert Gilliland is seen in the cockpit of an SR-71A. Chosen by Kelly Johnson for his experience testing the F-104 Starfighter, Robert Gilliland is seen in the cockpit of an SR-71A.
An Interview With Test Pilot Robert Gilliland
Back in the mid-1950s, the jet fighters that were coming off the drawing boards and production lines were finally capable of reaching the speed of sound. This was an indicator of things to come between the free world and communism. After a vicious testing ground over MiG Alley in North Korea, each side knew what they had to do in order to maintain the upper hand in a Cold War that was rapidly heating up.
One of the most unique and mission dedicated aircraft to be born of the Cold War was the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird. Every new bird of the drawing board needs that first test pilot, and for the SR-71 this task was assigned to Robert Gilliland.
Aviation Historian Warren Thompson conducts an insightful interview with Mr. Gilliland about just what it was like to fly this thoroughbred machine.