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Night Missions Over North Korea

The mighty Vought F4U-5N Corsair. The mighty Vought F4U-5N Corsair.
Carrier operations in a combat zone, even under a clear blue sky, can be a very stressful proposition. Add to the equation the dark of night, awful weather, a questioning chain of command, not to mention an enemy that is trying to shout you down, and you have a situation that has pushed many aviators all too close to that ragged edge.

Naval Aviator James Brown flew dozens of such missions – in the Vought F4U-5N Corsair – while assigned to Composite Squadron THREE (VC-3), then operating from the USS Oriskany (CVA-34) off the coast of wartime Korea. In his own words, Brown describes the stress that built up from mission after mission over the North. It was stress that nearly, but not quite, pushed him over the aforementioned ragged edge.
 

Beaufighter Tales

Bristol Beaufighter Mk 1F - R2198 - flying over the frozen English landscape. Bristol Beaufighter Mk 1F - R2198 - flying over the frozen English landscape.
During World War Two the Bristol Beaufighter was flown not only by British Commonwealth – both the British and the Canadians – countries, but also by the Americans in some of the first U. S. Army Air Corps night fighter squadrons. Later, the Beaufighter was flown by the Israelis and the Portuguese. In this article – by U. S. Air Force Colonel Brick Eisel – aircrew from all these countries recall what it was like to fly this purposeful machine.

This is some great, first-person, aviation history – told by the men who lived it.
 

American Flyers in RAF Bomber Command

Top, center of the picture, seemingly about to pour beer over the head of legendary Wing Commander Guy Gibson, is Squadron Leader Joe McCarthy - an American from Long Island. Top, center of the picture, seemingly about to pour beer over the head of legendary Wing Commander Guy Gibson, is Squadron Leader Joe McCarthy - an American from Long Island.
The question remains, what on earth was Bill Webster – an American – doing flying in RAF Bomber Command in early 1940? Pearl Harbor was still 21 months away. This question also applies to thousands of other Americans, most of them joining the war via the Royal Canadian Air Force. Why did they do it – out of a sense of honor or perhaps a desire for adventure? The answers to these questions are as varied as the men themselves.

British author Gordon Thorburn, in conjunction with research he is doing for an upcoming book, presents the stories of 21 such Americans who flew with No. 9 and No.617 squadrons.

Thorburn would like to contact anybody who has information about Americans flying in RAF Bomber Command. He can be contacted at: g@thorburnicus.eclipse.co.uk
 

Volume 8, Number 2 - 2nd Quarter 2007

LOGBOOK is a quarterly magazine covering the entire spectrum of aviation history, from the first flight to just yesterday. Civil, Military, Airline, General Aviation - We bring you the stories that have rarely or never been published before, told by the people who lived them. If the story is known, we dig to find additional information, documents and photographs to add to the knowledge about the topic. Short stories, sea stories, personal remembrances, in-depth information and simple hangar flying are the kind of unique aviation history you will find in the pages of LOGBOOK.

Back Issue: Available