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DATABASES

De Havilland Aircraft (including de Havilland Canada, de Havilland Australia and Airspeed)

Last Update: 25 September 2013

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This list is generally organized both chronologically and by the model of aircraft. Even so there will be some slight overlaps and/or discrepancies. It should be mentioned that, unless otherwise noted in the listing, the notation “number built” relates to the number of aircraft built in the United Kingdom


THE FIRST DESIGN
The de Havilland, first flight: December 1909, number built: 1, notes: A biplane design with a forward elevator and an aft rudder above a fixed tailplane. It was powered by a 45-horsepower de Havilland engine, which drove twin propellers via a chain drive.

The de Havilland, first flight: 10 September 1909, number built: 1, notes: As above, but powered by a 50-horspower de Havilland engine.


THE AIRCO AIRFRAMES
Note: The Aircraft Manufacturing Company (AIRCO) was established at Hendon Field in 1912, and on its staff was one Geoffrey de Havilland. Joining the company in 1914, the aircraft he designed for AIRCO all carried the “D.H.” prefix.

D.H.1, first flight: January 1915, number built: 73, notes: A two-seat pusher biplane powered by an 80-horsepower Renault V-8 engine. Occupants rode in a forward gondola-type fuselage.

D.H.1A, first flight: 1915, number built XX, notes: as described above except the D.H.1A was powered by a 120-horsepower Beardmore engine.

D.H.2, first flight: 1915, number built: 400, notes: A single-seat, pusher configured, fighter aircraft, powered by a 100-horsepower Gnome Monosoupape rotary engine. Some sources also indicate that a 100-horsepower Le Rhone rotary engine was alterative power plant, and that some models were later equipped with a 110-horsepower version of the Le Rhone. This biplane aircraft, essential a scaled down D.H.1, featured a forward gondola-type fuselage. Predating the interrupter gear, a single .303 Lewis gun was mounted on the forward portion of the fuselage, giving a wide angle of fire, although the pilot had to fly and operated the gun at the same time. A generally well received, if a bit tricky airplane to fly, the D.H.2 was soon eclipsed by more advanced fighters.

D.H.3, first flight: 1916, number built: 1, notes: A large, twin-engine bomber powered by two 120-horsepower Beardmore engines driving pusher propellers.

D.H.3A, first flight: 1916, notes: Same aircraft as above but re-engined with two 160-horsepower Beardmore engines.

D.H.4, first flight: August 1916, number built: 1,449, notes: A two-seat day bomber, considered high performance for its day. Although the prototype was powered by a B.H.P. engine, troubles with that engine, along with other advances, meant that the D.H.4 would be powered by a plethora of other engines, including a 200-horsepower RAF 3a engine, a 250-horsepower Rolls-Royce Eagle VI, a 360-horsepower Rolls-Royce Eagle VIII engine, and a 230-horsepowere Siddeley Puma engine. This biplane was configured in a more conventional tractor layout. Armament suites were also variable, but generally consisted of a pair of fixed, forwards firing .303 Vickers machine guns and a pair of flexible Vickers .303 machine guns – or Lewis guns – at the observer position. The D.H.4, which was built be a variety of UK sub-contractors, equipped both the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Naval Air Service. United States-built examples – not included in the total numbers above – were generally powered by a 400-horsepower Liberty engine, and were principally fielded by the U.S. Army.

D.H.4A, first flight: 1919, number built: 7, notes: Basically a modification of the D.H.4 to carry two passengers in an enclosed aft cabin. It was powered by a Rolls-Royce Eagle VI engine.

D.H.4R, first flight: 20 June 1919, number built: 1, notes: A one-off racing D.H.4, it was modified with a clipped lower wing. It won the Aerial Derby on 21 June 1919, at a speed of 129 miles per hour.

D.H.5, first flight: 1916, number built: 550, notes: A single-seat tractor scout/fighter biplane. Some were powered by a 110-horsepower Le Rhone rotary engine, while others were powered by a 110-horsepower Clerget engine.

D.H.6, first flight: 1917, number built: 2,282, notes: A two-seat trainer aircraft powered by a 90-horsepower RAF 1A engine.

D.H.7, not built, number built XX, notes: A single-seat fighter design to be powered by a Rolls-Royce Falcon engine.

D.H.8, not built, notes: A pusher aircraft design intended to carry a Coventry Ordnance 1½ - pound gun. Apparently, both the planned engine and the gun were not then available, and the design never went further.

D.H.9, first flight: June 1917, number built: 3,204, notes: A two-seat day bomber intended to replace the D.H.4, it was powered by a 230-horsepower Siddeley Puma engine. This bird corrected many of the problems manifested in the D.H.4, including reducing the distance between the cockpit and the observer station. One example, powered by a Napier Lion engine, set an altitude record of 30,500 feet on 1 February 1919.

D.H.9A, first flight:1917, number built: 885, notes: Follow on aircraft to the D.H.9, it swapped out the rather weak and unreliable Puma engine for a 400-horsepower Packard-built Liberty engine. This version was operational well into the 1920s.

D.H.9AJ Stag, first flight: 15 June 1926, number built: 1, notes: A one-off day bomber based on the D.H.9A, powered by a 460-horsepower Bristol Jupiter VI engine.

D.H9B, first flight, number built: 20, notes: Passenger version of the D.H.9, alternatively powered by the Siddeley Puma or the Packard Liberty engine. In this version, in addition to the pilot, two passengers could be carried – one forward and one aft of the pilot, all in an open cockpit.

D.H.9C, first flight: 1920, number built: 11, notes: Passenger version of the D.H.9, with similar power plants seen on the D.H.9B. This three passenger aircraft – four including the pilot – had a rather unusual configuration. One passenger rode in an open cockpit forward of the pilot, while aft of the pilot two passengers enjoyed the flight under an enclosed “coupe” top. The D.H.9C was operated by several airlines in the U.K., a few down in Australia, and one in Spain.

D.H.9J, first flight: 1926, number built: 14, notes: A trainer aircraft used by the RAF Reserve flying schools. It was powered by a 350-horsepower Armstrong-Siddeley Jaguar engine.

D.H.9R, first flight: 1919, number built: 1, notes: A one-off racer based on a clipped wing D.H. 9A, and powered by a 450-horsepower Napier Lion engine. This aircraft set a closed course speed and distance record in 1919.

D.H.10 Amiens Mk 1, first flight: 4 March 1918, number built: 1, notes: This was a large, higher-speed twin-engine bomber prototype developed from the D.H.3 bomber. Considered only a prototype, it was powered by two 230-horsepower B.H.P. pusher engines. The crew consisted of one pilot and two gunners.

D.H.10 Amiens Mk II, first flight: 20 April 1918, number built: 1, notes: Also considered a prototype, this was essentially the same airframe as above except it was now powered by two 375-horsepower Rolls-Royce Eagle tractor engines.

D.H.10 Amiens Mk III, first flight: 1918, number built: 8?, notes: Yet another prototype, this version of the D.H.10 was powered by two 400-horsepower Liberty tractor engines. Records are sketchy, but it appears that this version saw limited production, with perhaps 8 examples built.

D.H.10A Amiens Mk IIIA, first flight: 1918, number built: 220+, notes: A slightly modified airframe – the engine nacelles were relocated – it was a similarly powered version of the D.H.10 Mk III. It was a bit faster than the Mk III. Armament included both single and dual .303 Lewis guns, mounted fore and aft, and a bomb load of up to 900 pounds. Some 1291 airframes were ordered, but in the end the exact number built is not certain, but at least 220 are believed to have seen service. The D.H.10A was fielded too late to see action in World War One, but it would go on to perform fairly well both at home in the U.K , as well as Egypt and India.

D.H.11 Oxford, first flight: 1920, number built: 1, notes: A one-off, twin-engine long-range day bomber powered by a pair of 320-horsepower A.B.C. Dragonfly engines.

D.H.14 Okapi, first flight: 1919, number built: 3, notes: A day bomber intended to be a replacement for the D.H.9A. The Okapi was powered by a single 600-horsepower Rolls-Royce Condor engine. A single D.H.14 Okapi was re-engined with a 450-horsepower Napier Lion engine, and was intended for long-range commercial use.

D.H.15 Gazelle, first flight: May 1919, number built: 2, notes: Basically a D.H.9A with a more powerful 480-horsepower B.H.P. Atlantic engine.

D.H.16, first flight: May 1919, number built: 9, notes: A civilian version of the D.H.9A, it was powered by either a 360-horepower Rolls-Royce Eagle engine or a Napier Lion engine, and could carry four passengers in an enclosed cabin.

D.H.17, not built, notes: This was intended to be a reasonably large, twin-engine, enclosed cabin airliner.

D.H.18, first flight: March 1920, number built: 6, notes: Powered by a single 450-horsepower Napier Lion engine, this was the first de Havilland aircraft to be designed from the start as a passenger airliner. While the pilot sat in an open cockpit, the passengers rode in an enclosed cabin.

D.H.27 Derby, first flight: 13 October 1922, number built: 2, notes: A day bomber powered by a 600-horsepower Rolls-Royce Condor engine.

D.H.29 Doncaster, first flight: 5 July 1921, number built: 2, notes: An enclosed cabin, ten-passenger airliner with a single, high cantilever wing, which was powered by a single 450-horsepower Napier Lion engine.

D.H.34, first flight: 26 March 1922, number built: 12, notes: An enclosed cabin, ten-passenger biplane airliner powered by a single 450-horsepower Napier Lion engine. The pilot rode in a forward, open cockpit.

D.H.37, first flight: September 1922, number built: 2, notes: Powered by a 275-horsepower Rolls-Royce Falcon engine, this was a 2/3 seat civil touring biplane.

D.H. Glider, first flight: 6 October 1922, number built: 2, notes: A glider purposely built for the 1922 Itford, Sussex glider competition.

D.H.42 Dormouse, first flight: 25 July 1923, number built: 3, notes: A two-seat biplane intended for fighter reconnaissance missions. Two were powered by a 360-horsepower engine, while one was equipped with a Bristol Jupiter.

D.H.50, first flight: 30 July 1923, number built: 17, notes: Based on the D.H.9, this four-passenger aircraft was powered by a 230-horsepower Siddeley Puma engine. This aircraft was also built in number in Australia.

D.H.50J, first flight:1925, number built 1, notes: A one-off aircraft built for Cobham, and used on his survey flights to Cape Town, South Africa and Australia.

D.H.51, first flight: 1 July 1924, number built: 3, notes: A biplane transport seating 2 to three people. Two were powered by a 90-horsepower RAF1A engine, while one was powered by a Airdisco engine.

D.H.53 Humming Bird, first flight: September 1923, number built: 15, notes: A single seat military aircraft powered by a single 750-horsepower Douglas engine.

D.H.54 Highclere, first flight: 28 May 1925, number built: 1, notes: A one-off, fourteen-passenger airliner powered by a 600-horsepower Rolls-Royce Condor engine.

D.H.56 Hyena, first flight: July 1925, number built: 1, notes: A one-off Army co-operation aircraft powered by a 422-horsepower Armstrong-Siddeley Jaguar engine.

D.H.60 Moth, first flight: 22 February 1925, number built: 60, notes: The first of the Moth series of two-seat biplanes. This version was powered by a 60-horsepower Cirrus I engine. Later examples were powered by either a Cirrus II engine or an Armstrong-Siddeley Genet engine.

D.H.60 Moth Major, first flight: 1931, number built: 146, notes: Originally powered by a D.H. Gipsy 3 engine, then later by a 130-horsepower D.H. Gipsy Major engine.

D.H.60G Moth, first flight: July 1928, number built: 1,162, notes: Powered by either a 100-horsepower D.H. Gipsy 1 or a 120-horsepower D.H. Gipsy 2 engine, this aircraft was later called the Gipsy Moth.

D.H.60M, a D.H.60X with a metal fuselage, see below.

D.H.60X, first flight: 10 March 1927, number built: 394, notes: A modified version of the D.H.60 Moth powered by either a 80-horsepower Cirrus II or a 90-horsepower Cirrus III engine.

D.H.61 Canberra, first flight: 6 December 1927, number built: 8, notes: An eight to ten passenger airliner powered by a single 460-horsepower Bristol Jupiter VIII engine.

D.H.65 Hound, first flight: 17 November 1926, number built: 3, notes: A biplane aircraft powered by a 550-horsepower Napier Lion engine. It set several speed records.

D.H.66, first flight: 30 September 1926, number built: An airliner built for Imperial Airways and West Australian Airways. It was powered by three 425-horsepowers Bristol Jupiter engines.

D.H.71 Tiger Moth, first flight: 24 June 1927, number built: 2, notes: Two purpose-built airframes flown on a series of record setting flights. On 24 August 1927, this aircraft, which was powered by a 130-horsepower D.H Gipsy prototype engine, set the world record for the 100-kilometer closed circuit at 186.5 miles per hour.

D.H.72, first flight: unknown, number built: 1, notes: A prototype, all-metal bomber powered by 3 525-horsepower Jupiter engines.

D.H.75 Hawk Moth, first flight: 7 December1928, number built: 1, notes: A prototype aircraft powered by a 200-horsepower D.H. Ghost engine.

D.H.75A Hawk Moth, first flight: 1929, number built: 9, notes: Production version of the D.H 75, powered by a 250-horsepower Armstrong-Siddeley Lynx engine.

D.H.77, first flight: 1929, number built: 1, notes: A one-off, low-wing, monoplane fighter powered by a 337-horsepower Halford “H” engine.

D.H.80 Puss Moth, first flight: 9 September 1929, number built: 1?, notes: Prototype D.H.80 Puss Moth. It was configured as a low-wing monoplane aircraft with an enclosed cabin for two to three passengers.

D.H.80A Puss Moth, first flight: March 1930, number built: 261, notes: Production version powered by a 120-horsepower D.H Gipsy 3 engine.

D.H.81 Swallow Moth, first flight: 21 August 1931, number built: 1, notes: A one-off, two-seat monoplane powered by an experimental 82-horsepower D.H. Gipsy 4 engine.

D.H.82 Tiger Moth, first flight: 26 October 1931, number built: 5,055, notes: This mass produced aircraft was the RAF’s primary trainer for years. Powered by a 130-horsepower D.H. Gipsy Major engine, over 8,300 were built in the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada and New Zealand.

D.H.82 Queen Bee, first flight: 5 January 1935, number built: 320, notes: as above, this was a radio controlled target drone version of the Tiger Moth.

D.H.83 Fox Moth, first flight: 29 January 1932, number built: 98, notes: A four passenger general transport aircraft powered by a 130-horsepower D.H. Gipsy Major engine.

D.H.84 Dragon, first flight: 21 November 1932, number built: 115, notes: A six passenger general transport biplane powered by two 130-horsepower D.H. Gipsy Major engines.

D.H.85 Leopard Moth, first flight: 27 May 1933, number built: 133, notes: A development of the D.H.80 Puss Moth, this monoplane could carry three passengers. It was powered by a 130-horsepower D.H. Gipsy Major engine.

D.H.86 Express Airliner, first flight: 14 January 1934, number built 62, notes: Built expressly for the Qantas Empire route, this large biplane seated twelve passengers. Power came from four 205-horsepower D.H. Gipsy Six engines.

D.H.87B Hornet Moth, first flight: 9 May 1934, number built: 165, notes: A two-seat cabin biplane powered by a single 130-horsepower D.H. Gipsy Major engine.

D.H.88 Comet, first flight: 8 September 1934, number built: 5, notes: A purpose-built, low wing racing aircraft powered by two 230-horsepower D.H. Gipsy Six R engines. One example, “The Grosvenor House,” won the London to Melbourne Race in 1934, with an elapsed time of 70 hours and 54 minutes.

D.H.89A Dragon Rapide, first flight: 17 April 1934, number built: 685, notes: This was a six to eight passenger airliner and general purpose transport biplane, powered by two 205-horsepower D.H. Gipsy Six engines.

D.H.90 Dragonfly, first flight 12 August 1935, number built: 67, notes: A touring biplane powered by two 130-horsepower D.H. Gipsy Six engines.

D.H.91 Albatross, first flight: 20 May 1937, number built: 7, notes: Powered by four 524-horsepower D.H. Gipsy Twelve engines, this airliner could seat 22 passengers. It served with both Imperial Airways and BOAC.

D.H.93 Don, first flight: June 1937, number built: 50, notes: A military monoplane powered by a 525-horsepower D.H. Gipsy King engine. It was used for training and communication missions.

D.H.94 Moth Minor, first flight: 22 June 1937, number built: 100, notes: A light, general aviation and club aircraft powered by a 90-horsepower D.H. Gipsy Minor engine.

D.H.95 Flamingo, first flight: 28 December 1938, number built: 16, notes: The company’s first all-metal design, this medium capacity airliner was powered by two 890-horsepower Bristol Perseus X11C engines. It was a promising design but was not furthered due the War.

De Havilland D.H.98 Mosquito Series
D.H.98 Mosquito, first flight: 25 November 1940, number built: 7,781, notes: A twin-engine monoplane produced in several versions, for several missions. The “number built” listed above does include those airframes built in Canada and in Australia. It is generally accepted that there were over 40 variants of the type. These variants include:

Prototype, first flight: 25 November 1940, number built: 1, notes: Originally this aircraft carried the Serial E0234, which was later changed to W4050, it was powered by two Rolls-Royce Merlin 21 engines. This aircraft is currently in the collection at the De Havilland Heritage Centre & the Mosquito Aircraft Museum.

PR Mk I Prototype, first flight: 10 June 1941, number built: 1, notes: An unarmed photo-reconnaissance aircraft – Serial W4051 - powered by two Rolls-Royce Merlin 21 engines.

PR Mk I, notes: This was the production version of the PR Mk I prototype. It retained the Rolls-Royce Merlin 21 engines, and was similarly unarmed.

PR Mk I – Bomber Conversion, notes: Based on the PR Mk I airframe, this concept was re-designated B Mk IV.

F Mk II Prototype, first flight: 15 May 1941, number built: 1, notes: Serial W4052, like the other prototypes, this Mosquito was powered by two Rolls-Royce Merlin 21 engines. Missions included both day and night fighter, and long range intruder.

F Mk II, notes: Production version of the F Mk II prototype, this aircraft could be powered by either the Rolls Royce Merlin 21 or 23 engines. The first example carried the Serial W4074. The F Mk II was armed with four 20mm Hispano cannon and four .303 Browning machine guns. Within this variant there were numerous sub-variants developed for special missions, as well as several experimental types. These includes two that were modified with a powered dorsal turret mounting an additional four .303 Browning machine guns.

NF Mk II, notes: Dedicated night fighter. This may not have been an official designation.

PR Mk II, notes: Several F Mk II aircraft converted for photo-reconnaissance missions.

T Mk III, notes: Basically an unarmed dual control version of the F Mk II. It first flew in January 1942.

B Mk IV, notes: Developed from the PR Mk I, this was a bomber variant, and except for the bomb load, it was unarmed. It had long nacelles, which housed either the Rolls-Royce Merlin 21 or 23 engines.

PR Mk IV, notes: A photo-reconnaissance version of the B Mk IV. It first flew in April 1942. One interesting adaptation to this airframe was the courier version, where to passengers were carried prone in the bomb bay. Apparently only one was ever made, and was used by BOAC.

B Mk V, notes: The prototype of this variant – W4057 – was based on the B Mk IV, but with an new wing, which could mount either two 50-gallon drop tanks or two 500-pound bombs. It was powered by the Rolls-Royce Merlin 21 engine.

FB Mk VI, notes: Developed from the F Mk II – some sources say it was actually developed from the NF Mk II – this aircraft was a long-range, day and night, escort fighter and fighter-bomber. It had the same armament as the F Mk II, and could carry a variety of bombs, rockets and drop tanks on the wings. It could be powered by a number of different engines, including the Rolls-Royce Merlin 22, 23 or 25. The prototype first flew on 1 June 1942, while the first production model flew in February 1943.

FB Mk VI Sea Mosquito, notes: Two standard FB Mk VI airframes modified for carrier operations. This included strengthening the fuselage and installing an arresting hook.

B Mk VII, notes: A bomber variant built in Canada, and based on the B Mk V. In all 25 examples were built, none of which were operated outside of North America. The B Mk VII – first flown on 25 September 1942 – was powered by two Packard Merlin 31 engines.

PR Mk VIII, notes: A high-altitude photo reconnaissance aircraft, which was a conversion of existing B Mk IV airframes. It was powered by two supercharged Rolls-Royce Merlin 61 engines. It first flew on 10 October 1942, and only five were ever converted.

B Mk IX, notes: A high altitude bomber powered by two supercharged Rolls-Royce 72 engines. Except for the bomb load, it was unarmed. It first flew on 24 March 1943. Several modifications were made within the type, including a pathfinder aircraft, and one version that could carry a single 4,000-pound bomb.

PR Mk IX, notes: An unarmed, high altitude photo reconnaissance aircraft. Basically a version of the B Mk IX, it first flew in April 1943. At least one example was powered by two Rolls-Royce Merlin 67 engines.

FB Mk X, notes: A fighter-bomber version similar to the FB Mk VI, but powered by two Rolls-Royce Merlin 67 engines. This variant was not built.

NF Mk X, notes: As with the FB Mk X, this variant, to be powered by two Rolls-Royce Merlin 61 engines, was proposed but not built.

FB Mk XI, notes: Fighter-bomber proposal similar to the FB VI, but powered by two Rolls-Royce Merlin 61 engines. It was not built.

NF Mk XII, notes: A night-fighter development of the NF Mk II, it was a modification of existing airframes with the new Airborne Intercept Mk VIII radar. This was mounted in a thimble radome. Carrying only the four 20mm cannon, this variant first flew in August 1942, and was powered by either the Rolls-Royce 21 or 23 engines.

NF Mk XIII, notes: Powered by two Rolls-Royce 21, 23 or 25 engines, this variant was a development of the FB Mk VI. It carried the Mk VIII radar, and four 20mm cannon.

MF Mk XIV, notes: A proposal to make the NF Mk XIII into a high altitude night-fighter by mounting a pair of supercharged Rolls-Royce Merlin 67 engine. This variant was not built.

NF Mk XV, notes: A high altitude night-fighter developed from the PR Mk VIII, it had extended wingtips, reduced fuel capacity, only the four .303 Browning machine guns, a pressurized cockpit and was powered by two supercharged Rolls-Royce Merlin 61 engines. This variant, which first flew in September 1942, was hurriedly fielded to counter the high altitude German reconnaissance aircraft then being introduced.

PR Mk XVI, notes: First flown in July 1943, and powered by supercharged Rolls-Royce Merlin 72, 73, 76 or 77 engines, this photo reconnaissance Mosquito was built standard with a pressurized cabin. It also had three additional fuel tanks in the bomb bay. This aircraft was actually a development of the B Mk XVI.

B Mk XVI, notes: A development of the B Mk IX, with a pressurized cabin, and powered by either the Rolls-Royce Merlin 72, 73, 76 or 77 engines. Some of these Mosquito B Mk XVI aircraft were modified to carry a single 4,000-pound bomb.

NF Mk XVII, notes: A night fighter conversion developed from the NF Mk XII, but equipped with an American-made Mk 10 radar set mounted in the nose. This Mosquito variant first flew in March 1943, and in all 100 were converted

FB Mk XVIII, notes: Known as the Tsetse, this aircraft was basically a FB Mk VI with a 57mm anti-tank gun mounted in the nose. Powered by Rolls-Royce Merlin 25 engines, it was primarily used as an anti-submarine, anti-ship aircraft. This Mosquito variant first flew in June 1943, and in all 18 were built.

NF Mk XIX, notes: A night fighter developed from the NF Mk XIII, this Mosquito variant first flew in April 1944.. Carrying either the British or the American radar equipment, it was powered by two Rolls-Royce Merlin 25 engines.

B Mk XX, notes: The second run of Mosquitoes built in Canada, and powered by two Packard Merlin 31 or 33 engines. A sub variant was the American F-8, which was a photo reconnaissance aircraft flown by the Army Air Forces. Of the 145 built, 40 were converted to American F-8.

FB Mk 21, notes: Also Canadian-built, this was a fighter bomber similar to the FB Mk VI. Powered by either a Packard Merlin 31 or 33 engines, only three of this variant were ever built.

T Mk 22, notes: Canadian-built, dual control training aircraft. Unarmed, this variant was powered by two Packard Merlin 33 engines. Only six were built

B Mk 23, notes: Would have been a Canadian-built high altitude bomber based on the B Mk XX, but with Packard Merlin 69 engines. This Mosquito development was not pursued due to the lack of available engines.

FB Mk 24, notes: Canadian-built Mosquito, it was a high altitude fighter bomber based on the FB Mk 21, and powered by two Packard Merlin 301 engines. Only one was built

B Mk 25, notes: This Mosquito was built in Canada, and was identical to the B Mk XX, except it was powered by two Packard Merlin 225 engines. In all, 400 examples of this Mosquito were built.

FB Mk 26, notes: This was a Canadian-built Mosquito fighter bomber based on the earlier FB Mk VI. It was powered by Packard Merlin 225 engines and was equipped with various American systems. In all, 338 examples of this Mosquito variant were built.

T Mk 27, notes: Based on the T Mk 22, but powered by two Packard Merlin 225 engines.

FB Mk 28, notes: A model number assigned to a Canadian-built Mosquito, but not used.

B Mk 29, notes: A dual control Mosquito, this was a trainer bomber converted from existing FB Mk 26 airframes, and similarly powered by Packard Merlin 225 engines. This Mosquito was also known under the designation T Mk 29.

FB Mk 29, notes: The same conversion program as the B Mk 29.

NF Mk 30, notes: A high altitude night fighter based on the NF Mk XIX, but powered by Rolls-Royce Merlin 72, 76 or 113 engines. This Mosquito variant first flew in March 1944

NF Mk 31, notes: A Packard powered Mosquito night fighter that was not built.

PR Mk 32, notes: A special high altitude photo reconnaissance aircraft with a lightened fuselage converted from the PR Mk XVI, but with extended wingtips. It was powered by two supercharged Rolls-Royce Merlin 113 or 114 engines. First flown in August 1944, a total of five examples of this Mosquito variant were built.

TF Mk 33, notes: Also known as the TR Mk 33, this was a FB Mk VI modified for shipboard use. Employed by the Fleet Air Arm, it had folding wings and was powered by Rolls-Royce Merlin 25 engines.

PR Mk 34, notes: This was a very long range photo reconnaissance Mosquito based on the PR Mk XVI. It was powered by two Rolls-Royce Merlin 113 or 114 engines. The PR Mk 34A was the same aircraft but with a different cockpit layout.

B Mk 35, notes: Basically a B Mk XVI Mosquito, but powered by two Rolls-Royce Merlin 114 or 114A engines. Of the 274 examples built, 65 were produced by Airspeed Ltd.

PR Mk 35, notes: Ten photo reconnaissance aircraft converted from existing B Mk 35 airframes.

TT Mk 35, notes: Several B Mk 35 airframes converted to target tow aircraft.

NF Mk 36, notes: A night fighter based on the NF Mk 30, but equipped with more powerful Rolls-Royce Merlin 113 engine. It was also equipped with the American Mk 10 radar set and packed four 20mm cannon.

TF Mk 37, notes: Also known under the designation TR Mk 37, this Mosquito was an anti-ship fighter, based on the TF Mk 33, it was armed with a torpedo. It had a British Mk 13B radar fitted in the nose.

NF Mk 38, notes: A night fighter based on the NF Mk 36. It was equipped with the Rolls-Royce Merlin 113, 113A, 114 or 114A engines, and the British Mk 9 radar set. This was the last de Havilland Mosquito built in Britain.

TT Mk 39, notes: A target tow aircraft converted from existing B Mk XVI Mosquito airframes, primarily for the Royal Navy.

FB Mk 40, notes: Based on the FB Mk VI, this was an Australian-built Mosquito fighter. The first 100 aircraft were powered by two Packard Merlin 31 engines, while the remained were powered by two Packard Merlin 33 engines. This Mosquito variant first flew in July 1943, and in all, 178 examples were built.

PR Mk 40, notes: The was a photo reconnaissance conversion of the Australian-built FB Mk 40 fighters, powered by Packard Merlin 31 engines

PR Mk 41, notes: An Australian-built photo reconnaissance Mosquito based on the PR Mk 40, but powered by supercharged Packard Merlin 69 engines.

FB Mk 42, notes: An Australian-built fighter bomber based on the FB Mk 40, but powered by two Packard Merlin 69 engines. This variant was not carried forward and the prototype aircraft was converted into the prototype PR Mk 41 Mosquito.

T Mk 43, notes: An Australian conversion of the FB Mk 40 Mosquito into a dual control training aircraft.

D.H 100 Vampire, first flight: 20 September 1943, number built: 1,157, notes: The de Havilland Vampire was a single-seat jet fighter powered by a 3,000-pound thrust turbojet engine. Several variants were built.

D.H.103 Hornet, first flight: 28 July 1944, number built: 384, notes: A single-seat, long range fighter aircraft operated by the RAF. The de Havilland Hornet was powered by two Rolls-Royce Merlin 130 or 131 engines, each developing 2,080 horsepower.

D.H. 104 Dove, first flight: 25 September 1945, number built: 510+, notes: The was the de Havilland first post World War Two design project. It was a twin engine, low wing monoplane airliner seating up to eleven passengers. It was powered by two 385-horsepower D.H. Gipsy Queen 70 engines.

De Havilland D.H. 106 Comet Series
D.H.106 Comet, first flight: 27 July 1949, number built: please see specific variant, notes: Acknowledged to be the world’s first jet powered airliner. Several airframes were built or partially built but never actually flown. It was built in several variants, including:

Comet 1, notes: First in the line of Comet airliners, a total of eleven Comet 1 airframes were built. They were powered by four Rolls-Royce Ghost Mk 1 engines. The prototype Comet 1 first flew on 27 July 1949. The remaining 10 Comet 1 airframes went to BOAC.

Comet 1A, notes: Although physically the same size as the Comet 1, the Comet 1A could carry a few additional passengers. First flown on 11 August 1952, the Comet 1A was powered by four Rolls-Royce Ghost Mk 2 engines. Ten de Havilland Comet 1A airframes were built.

Comet 1X, notes: This aircraft, sometimes referred to as a Comet 2X, was the developmental airframe for the Comet 2 series of airliners. Only one airframe was so designated. The Comet 2X was slightly larger than the Comet 1, and was powered by four Rolls-Royce Avon Mk 117 engines. First flight of the Comet 2X was on 16 February 1952.

Comet 1XB, notes: Four existing Comet 1A airframes converted for use by the military. Two went to the Ministry of Supply and two went to the Royal Canadian Air Force.

Comet 2, notes: Twelve de Havilland Comet 2 aircraft were built. Based on the Comet 1X aircraft, these were similarly powered by four Roll-Royce Avon 117 engines. The de Havilland Comet 2 first flew on 29 August 1953. Several airframes were converted for military use.

Comet 2E, notes: On de Havilland Comet 2 airframe converted for use by the RAF.

Comet 2R, notes: Three de Havilland Comet 2 airframes converted for use by the RAF.

Comet 3, notes: Two airframes built - one airworthy aircraft and one non-airworthy, ground test airframe. Longer than the Comet 2, the Comet 3 was powered by four Rolls-Royce Avon 502 engines. The Comet 3 first flew on 19 July 1954. This aircraft did much of the testing for the follow-on de Havilland Comet 4 series of aircraft.

Comet 3B, notes: This was an upgrade of the sole de Havilland Comet 3 airframe. It first flew on 21 August 1958.

Comet 4, notes: Identical in size to the Comet 3, the Comet 4 also had four Rolls-Royce Avon 502 engine, but could carry a heavier payload over a greater distance. A total of 27 de Havilland Comet 4 aircraft were built. One Comet 4 airframe was used as the test bed for the de Havilland Nimrod AEW aircraft.

Comet 4B, notes: A stretched variant of the Comet 4, the Comet 4B had a slightly reduced wingspan and was powered by four Rolls-Royce Avon 524 engines. Eighteen de Havilland Comet 4B aircraft were built.

Comet 4C, notes: Combining the wing of the Comet 4 and the fuselage of the Comet 4B, the de Havilland Comet 4C was powered by four Rolls-Royce Avon 525B2 engines. In all, 24 de Havilland Comet 4C airliners were built.

Comet C Mk 1, notes: Not used.

Comet C Mk 2, notes: A military transport variants of the de Havilland Comet 2. Three airframes came off the line as Comet C Mk 2s, while four were converted from civilian Comet 2 airliners destined for BOAC, but never taken up.

Comet C Mk 3, notes: Not used

Comet C Mk 4, notes: Five new-build de Havilland Comet 4 airframes that went to the RAF.

Comet T Mk 2, notes: Two de Havilland Comet 2 airliners that were destined for BOAC, but were delivered to the RAF.

D.H.108, first flight:15 May 1949, number built: 3, notes: An experimental test aircraft, the de Havilland D.H. 108 was a swept wing, tailless jet powered by a single D.H. Ghost 105 engine.

D.H.110 Sea Vixen, first flight: 26 October 1951, number built: ?, notes: A two-seat, carrier capable fighter for the Royal Navy. It was powered by a Rolls-Royce Avon engine.

D.H.112 Venom, first flight: 2 September 1949, number built: 1,143, notes: The de Havilland D.H.112 Venom was a step up from the first generation of fighter aircraft. Powered by a D.H. Ghost jet engine, it came as a single seat variant, as well as a two-seat fighter and a naval Sea Venom variant for the Royal Navy.

D.H. 113 Vampire, first flight: 28 August 1949, number built: 95, notes. A two-seat night fighter variant of the de Havilland D.H.100 Vampire, the D.H.113 was radar equipped and powered by a single D.H. Goblin 3 engine.

D.H.114 Heron, first flight: 10 May 1950, number built: 139+, notes: Looking very similar to the de Havilland D.H.104 Dove, the D.H.114 Heron was a light airliner that could carry up to seventeen passengers. It was powered by four 250-horsepower D.H. Gipsy Queen 30 engines.

D.H.115 Vampire, first flight: 15 November 1950, number built: 804, notes: A trainer variant of the de Havilland D.H.100 Vampire, with side-by-side seating. Power was on D.H. Goblin 35 engine.

D.H.121 Trident, notes: A large, three engine airliner.

D.H. 125, notes: A medium sized business jet.


Airspeed Division of de Havilland Aircraft

AS-51 Horsa, first flight: 1941, number built: 3,661, notes: The AS-51 was a troop carrying assault glider.

AS-57 Ambassador, first flight: 10 July 1947, number built: 22, notes: A medium size, high wing airliner seating 47 passengers. The AS-57 Ambassador was powered by two 2,600-horsepower Bristol Centaurus 661 engines

AS-65 Consol, first flight: 1946, number built: 207, notes: Based on the earlier Airspeed Oxford military trainer, the Consol was a light transport seating six passengers, and powered by two 395-horsepower Armstrong-Siddeley Cheetah X engines.


De Havilland Canada

DHC-1 Chipmunk, first flight: 22 May 1946, number built: 1,217, notes: A single engine, low wing trainer with tandem seating. Power was from a 145-horsepower D.H. Gipsy Major engine. The de Havilland Canada D.H.C.1 Chipmunk was used extensively by the Royal Air Force and the Royal Canadian Air Force.

DHC-2 Beaver, first flight: 19 August 1947, number built 1500+, notes: Powered by a single 450-horsepower Pratt & Whitney R-985 Wasp Junior radial engine, the D.H.C.2 Beaver was a high wing, light utility aircraft with STOL capabilities. It could be equipped with wheels, skis or either normal or amphibious floats. The was seating for seven passengers The D.H.C.2 Beaver was flown by the U.S. Army as the L-20 and the Royal Army as the Beaver AL Mk 1. Over the years several D.H.C.2 Beaver have been re-engined with a turboprop power plant, mainly the Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A.

DHC-3 Otter, first flight: 12 December 1951, number built 392+, notes: Looking like a stretched version of the de Havilland Canada D.H.C.2 Beaver, the Otter was powered by a single 600-horsepower Pratt & Whitney Wasp radial engine. It could seat up to ten passengers.

DHC-4 Caribou, first flight: 30 July 1958, notes: A medium size transport aircraft powered by two 1,450-horsepower Pratt & Whitney R-2000 radial engines. The wing was mounted high on the fuselage, and there was an aft loading ramp. Passenger capacity was between 30 to 40 people.

DHC-5 Buffalo, notes:

DHC-6 Twin Otter, notes:

DHC-7 Dash 7, notes:

DHC-8 Dash 8, notes:


De Havilland Australia

DHA-3 Drover 1, first flight: 23 January 1948, number built: 20, notes: The DHA-3 Drover is a low wing, light transport designed to be operated from unimproved air strips. It is powered by three 145-horsepower D.H. Gipsy Major 10 Mk 2 engines, and could seat up to eight passengers. Production was terminated in 1953.

DHA-3 Drover 2, notes: The same as the Drover 1, except the Drover 2 was equipped with slotted flaps.

DHA-3 Drover 3, notes: A fleet of seven Drover 1 airframes re-engined with three 180-horsepower Lycoming engines. The first conversion was completed in 4 June 1960. All the Drover 3 aircraft were operated by the Australia-based Royal Flying Doctor Service, and could carry a pilot, two doctors and two stretchers.



 

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